Hydronic Systems, Inc. and Crafton Tull were fortunate to be selected to work on Tulsa’s Remington Tower energy efficiency retrofit. Remington Tower was built in 1983 as the first office condominium building in Tulsa where the tenants could own their office spaces outright. Over the years, the concept was abandoned, and all the of the building came to be held by a single owner. Located on I44, there are currently 24 tenants who are occupying the space no more than 60 hours a week. The new owners have taken cue from the I44 expansion to update the building, starting with the control system. Below, you can read the story published in the February 2015 Chief Engineer publication.

In order to reduce the carbon footprint and shrink energy expenses, the hi-end Remington Tower office building needed an HVAC control retrofit.

In order to reduce the carbon footprint and shrink energy expenses, the hi-end Remington Tower office building needed an HVAC control retrofit.

The new owners of Remington Tower office building in Tulsa, OK, looked into an energy retrofit immediately after its purchase in July of last year. The 20-story, 96,000 square-foot building was constructed in 1983, and while its water-source heat pumps system remains in good condition, the original controls were obsolete.

“Our main concern was that the building was being conditioned as if occupied around the clock, and that’s far from efficient,” said Mark Roberts, part owner of the building.  Roberts developed and co-owned Muskogee Community Hospital, the world’s first for-profit LEED Gold hospital. It goes without saying that he’s a proponent of sustainable buildings, and takes building energy efficiency pretty seriously.

“Of the 168 hours in a week, Remington Tower is occupied, at most, 60 hours, “he continued.  ” We wanted automated controls that would turn back the heating and cooling systems for the other two-thirds of the time.” The building serves as office space for 24 tenants.

Boozer watches as John Eagle, a Hydronic Systems technician, wires a VFD for one of the two main loop pumps.

Boozer watches as John Eagle, a Hydronic Systems technician, wires a VFD for one of the two main loop pumps.

With an energy analysis from engineering firm Crafton Tull, and product expertise from manufacturer’s representative Hydronic Systems Inc., the planned-for controls retrofit yielded better results than Roberts had hoped for.

Duane Harmon, PE, completed an extensive energy study at Remington Tower.  Harman is a senior project manager at Crafton Tull’s mechanical engineering department in Tulsa. The 20-person firm, headquartered in Roger, AR, offers building design services including architecture, interior design, as well as mechanical, electrical, structural, and civil engineering.

Read the full article HERE